This post was originally written in May of 2017, but never published… until now!

Need some new (or new-ish) local (or local-ish) music to listen to? LondonFuse has taken all the guesswork out by searching London, Ontario on bandcamp and giving you the results.

Some are local artists, some were just inspired enough by London to write about it. Regardless, they all have the London connection, ready to take over your ear holes.

Read, listen, enjoy!

Cedar and Pine's Victoria in July album cover.
Cedar and Pine released Victoria in July in April 2016.

CEDAR AND PINE – Victoria in July

This indie-rock duo consisting of Derek Stocking (guits/vox) and Tyse Burrows (keys/drums) dates back to 2015. Their 2016 release Victoria in July, sounds like something from a far more established band.

Their style sounds like a modern day mash-up of Great Big Sea and Weakerthans, and they balance folk and indie quite well with a minimal setup.

For a self-produced EP, Victoria in July is very well mixed and put together. Lyrically, Cedar and Pine manage to explore common indie themes of love, loss and self-realization without being sappy or cliche.

It’s a good listen. The duo has a great sense of dynamics, building a song up or breaking it right down to suit the mood. The track Pocket flows from a simple drum/guitar opening to broken down keys and vocals before swelling up to a power-chord chorus and outro.

While Victoria in July only contains four songs, it still gives the feeling of a well-rounded release. BONUS NOTE: Check out their facebook page for their live performance videos and for an impromptu parkour demo.

Andreas London Ontario album cover.
Windsor musician Andreas released London, ON in January of 2012.

ANDREAS – London, Ontario EP

Andreas (Josh Kaiser), is an experimental musician from Windsor, Ontario who – according to bandcamp – enjoys “just making music for himself and anyone who cares to listen.”

His London, Ontario EP was recorded in 2012 and features nine tracks.

The mood is eclectic on the EP, ranging from slow moving electro-beats with organ overlays to olde-tyme acoustic shuffles. Most of the EP is sweet and inviting. Untitled sounds as if it could be the theme to Fred Penner’s Place, while Almost Homeless makes you feel like a hobo riding the rails.

It’s a good listen if you enjoy headphones. There are plenty of stereo tricks and random sound overlays (think bits of conversation placed under the main mix), guaranteeing replay value. Each composition provides the framework of a story, and the absence of lyrics allows listeners to customize the tale to their own experience.

Have a listen with eyes closed and see what parts of the city come to life with each different track.

The Patterns III album cover.
The Patterns III is (go figure) the third offering from UK transplants The Patterns.

THE PATTERNS – The Patterns III

The Patterns are a four-piece pop-punk band originally from England who now call London, ON home. Their most recent bandcamp offering, The Patterns III, was recorded over the span of a week in November of 2016, and released December 6.

The EP is an easy listen – tight riffs over driving drums, with enough call and answer vocals to make The Patterns a great party band.

The chord progressions are pretty standard pop formula, as are the droning guitar notes over power chord choruses. But, there is a reason it’s standard – because it works. The Patterns fully exploit the genre while keeping their signature attached to everything.

Music fans with OCD will love The Patterns’ album art, which is – as the name implies – a pattern print. Their first release, The Patterns I & II, is a lovely pink argyle.

The lyrics do contain the standard angst and heartbreak that dominate pop-punk, but it would be a mistake to write off The Patterns because of that. The songs tell stories, first and third-person, which is far more engaging than just “I feel…”

Time Enough at Last and Epilogue are great examples of deeper story-telling while still delivering the 1-2 punch required of any good pop-punk tune.

Want more?

Here is part five.

Part four.

Three.

Two.

One.

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